Category : Articles

Key Takeaways New research shows that fluvoxamine, a drug typically prescribed for patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), might help COVID-19 patients. While the study is ongoing, the initial findings look promising. The medication might help prevent respiratory complications in some patients with COVID-19. A team of researchers at the Washington University School of Medicine in ..

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Each week, Get Meds Info explains a term from health, medicine, science, or technology. Chronic How to say it: Chronic (craw-NICK) What it means: Lasting a long time; being slow and progressive. Where it comes from: From Greek, chronikós, “of time.” > Where you might see or hear it: Many health conditions can be characterized as chronic, meaning that ..

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Constipation is a decrease in the frequency of passage of well-formed stools and is characterized by stools that are hard and small and difficult to expel. It’s a subjective condition, differing for individuals based upon their normal pattern of bowel movements and their symptoms of discomfort. It can be caused by anything that slows down ..

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Breakthrough pain (BTP) is the pain that occurs between regularly scheduled doses of pain medication. It is a distressing symptom requiring prompt treatment. > Most patients with chronic pain, including palliative care and hospice patients, are given medication to use as needed to treat breakthrough pain. Medication for BTP is typically fast-acting with a relatively ..

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Medication errors, or mistakes involving medications, are so common that in the medical profession we have the “5 Rights” to help us avoid them. The Five Rights are: The right dose The right medication The right patient The right route The right time Basically, before a nurse or other healthcare professional gives a medication we ..

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For patients with kidney failure, renal dialysis may be the only treatment keeping them alive, so the decision to stop dialysis is often a difficult one to make. By the time stopping dialysis even becomes an option, patients are often so sick and have such poor quality of life that the decision whether to continue ..

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Oncology nurses are very important members of your healthcare team. In fact, nurses are often the first, last, or possibly the only healthcare professional you see on your hematology appointments. There are many different types of nurses, and it may be hard to know the role that each one of them plays in your care. Here ..

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A primary care provider (PCP) for elderly patients is called a geriatrician. This kind of physician has finished a residency in either internal medicine or family medicine and is board-certified to treat older adults. It’s important for your elderly parents to see a geriatrician because they specialize in treating the complex medical needs aging requires. ..

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It might seem strange that a service developed to deliver groceries and offer discounts on gas is now the best way to get affordable prescriptions. On closer inspection, however, there is a sort of thematic throughline for everything included in a Walmart+ membership. Rx for less is simply the latest—and arguably, the most effective—way in ..

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Drones or unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are emerging as a new medical tool that can help mitigate logistical problems and make health-care distribution more accessible. Experts are considering various possible applications for drones, from carrying disaster relief aid to transporting transplant organs and blood samples. Drones have the capacity to carry modest payloads and can ..

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Most of us take for granted the convenience of contact lenses to correct common vision problems. However, contact lenses are also used to deliver healing properties to people with eye disease. Contact lenses are used to provide a bandage of sorts to improve healing and alleviate pain from certain eye surface conditions. However, scientists are ..

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We usually think of contact lenses as simple medical devices to correct our vision problems. In fact, contact lenses are so common and widespread throughout the world that the public regards them as commodities rather than medical devices. But today, contact lenses are being used to treat severe medical eye problems. For a long time, eye ..

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For a while now, innovation and invention have been bringing health and wellness services to our homes. For instance, technology has revolutionized the way we interact with doctors. Virtual appointments and check-ups are not uncommon anymore. Our homes are becoming equipped with an increasing number of smart devices, and as we age we are able ..

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More than a decade ago, scientists already recognized the potential smart clothes with noninvasive sensors could have on improving well-being. While, initially, consumers were mostly professional athletes, the applications of smart apparel are now expanding into other areas, too, from home use and ambulatory health monitoring. As smart clothing becomes more affordable and accessible, you ..

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Mobile health devices and applications have the potential to become powerful health tools. Not only have advancements allowed smartphones to be used as diagnostic devices (think the inclusion of sleep tracking functionality), but the simple fact that so many of us have gadgets at the ready helps make health care more accessible. More than 100,000 ..

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What should you do if someone with Alzheimer’s disease or another dementia talks about committing suicide? How should you react? What questions should you ask? What action should you take? > Knowing the Risk Factors According to a study published in Alzheimer’s & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer’s Association, data from the Department of ..

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Key Takeaways States differ in how they are prioritizing the COVID-19 vaccine for people experiencing homelessness. Incentives such as transportation, gift cards, and even socks may help convince people experiencing homelessness to get the vaccine. Across the country, healthcare professionals are worried their patients may agree to get COVID-19 vaccine when it’s their turn in ..

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No amount of lead exposure is safe. Chronic lead poisoning can lead to a long list of maladies, including anorexia, anemia, tremor, and gastrointestinal symptoms. Lead exposure is particularly bad for the developing brain, and in children can result in growth retardation, developmental delay, and mental retardation. > In addition to the human toll, chronic ..

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On any given night in the United States, some 550,000 people or more experience homelessness —including tens of thousands of children and chronically ill individuals. These individuals are living on the street or in a car, staying in a shelter, or hopping between relatives’ or friends’ homes for an indeterminate amount of time. While official definitions differ, ..

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 We don’t always see it, but our environment is shaping our health every moment of every day. Where we live, what we eat, and how we interact with the world around us can tip the scales (sometimes literally) between healthy or not. That’s where environmental health professionals, policies, and programs all come into play. While we tend ..

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“Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food.” Hippocrates may have had a point. What we put into our bodies affects our health in countless ways. Aligning with the food-as-medicine movement, states are increasing taxes on processed foods, and Medicare and Medicaid are piloting programs for food subsidies. > Nutrition and Chronic Disease Access ..

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